“Triggers for the abolition of the death penalty in Africa: a Southern African perspective”

07/02/2018
Report

FIDH and DITSHWANELO published on the 5th November 2017 a study on the “Triggers for the abolition of the death penalty in Africa: a Southern African perspective”. The 36 pages study identifies the triggers leading to the abolition of the death penalty in Africa.

In Africa, more than 80% of countries have abolished the death penalty in law or in practice, with only 10 countries executing within the past decade. Compared to the rest of the world, Africa has one of the lowest execution rates per capita. This can be explained by the fact that multiple factors are triggering an abolitionist trend all across the continent. The Southern Africa perspective developed in the study shows that the region is moving in the right direction of abolition since the only country that still regularly executes is Botswana.

““Although the process that leads to the abolition of the death penalty is unique in each country, the campaign is fought around the world and we believe that success is most achievable by working together and sharing experiences. This study is meant to contribute to this effort””

Said Alice Mogwe, FIDH Secretary General and DITSHWANELO Executive Director.

The overwhelming majority of countries which have abolished the death penalty in Africa, have done so following years or sometimes decades of political transition.

The study llustrate how the struggle for the abolition of the death penalty in Africa has mobilised a wide range of actors that have included judges, lawyers, parliamentarians, trade unionists or youth movements.

FIDH, a member of the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty (WCADP), and DITSHWANELO reiterate their total opposition to the death penalty for all crimes and in all circumstances.

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